Dual Enrollment - Interdisciplinary Studies, Associate of Applied Science (AF53)  Degree


Campus Locations: Vidalia, Swainsboro

The Associate of Applied Science Degree in Interdisciplinary Studies (AIS) allows customization of the program of study based on each student's academic and professional goals. Areas of concentration include education, public safety, business, and computer/information technology, industrial/engineering technology, and health sciences. The program curriculum may be strategically selected to build upon the student's goals and objectives. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition or continued education. A student might choose an interdisciplinary studies program if his or her specific goals and interests cannot be met through a school's existing majors, minors, and electives.

*Technical College System of Georgia courses are acceptable for full credit toward the elective hours for this Associate Degree.

This program is limited to high school Dual Enrollment students only.

Requirements

  • Must meet with high school counselor and STC’s high school initiative coordinator;
  • Submit a completed STC Dual Enrollment Application;
  • Submit a Dual Enrollment Funding Application at www.gafutures.org;
  • Submit official high school/high school equivalent transcripts;
  • Submit official college transcripts, if applicable;
  • Satisfy Placement Testing requirements.

Program Costs

Costs are estimates and are subject to change.

Curriculum Outline (65 hours)
General Core (24-25 hours) 25
COLL 1040

(Prerequisite: None) This course is designed to provide tools to assist students to acquire skills necessary to achieve academic and professional success in their chosen occupational/technical program of study. Topics include: Computer Applications/Technology Skills, Getting off to a Good Start, Learning and Personality Styles, Time and Money Management, Study and Test Taking Skills, Stress Management and Wellness, Communication Skills, and Career Exploration.

3
Area I: Language Arts/Communication (6 hours) 3
ENGL 1101

(Prerequisite: Appropriate English Placement Test Score AND Appropriate Reading Placement Test Score) Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.

3
Choose One (3 hours)
ENGL 1102

(Prerequisite: ENGL 1101) Emphasizes the student's ability to read literature analytically and meaningfully and to communicate clearly. Students analyze the form and content of literature in historical and philosophical contexts. Topics include reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama; research; and writing about literature.

3
SPCH 1101

(Prerequisites: ENGL 1101- Institutional Requirement) Introduces the student to the fundamentals of oral communication. L Topics include selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, analysis of ideas presented by others, and professionalism.

3
Area II: Social/Behavioral Sciences
Choose Two (6 hours)
ECON 1101

(Prerequisites: Regular Admission) Provides a description and analysis of economic operations in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of economic concepts and policies as they apply to everyday life. Topics include basic economic principles; economic forces and indicators; capital and labor; price, competition, and monopoly; money and banking; government expenditures, federal and local; fluctuations in production, employment, and income; and United States economy in perspective.

3
HIST 1111

(Pre-requisites: Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and reading Placement Test Scores)(Co-requisites: None)Emphasizes the study of intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the civilizations of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from the prehistoric era to early modern times. Topics include the Prehistoric Era, the Ancient Near East, Ancient India, Ancient China, Ancient Rome, Ancient Africa, Islam, the Americas, Japan, Ancient Greece, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance.

3
HIST 1112

(Pre-requisites: Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores)(Co-requisite: None)Emphasizes the study of the intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from early modern times to the present. Topics include transitions to the Modern World, scientific revolution and the Enlightenment, political modernization, economic modernization, imperialism, and the Twentieth Century.

3
HIST 2111

(Pre-requisites: Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores)(Co-requisites: None)Emphasizes the study of U. S. History to 1877 to include the post-Civil War period. The course focuses on the period from the Age of Discovery through the civil War to include geographical, intellectual, political, economic and cultural development of the American people. It includes the history of Georgia and its constitutional development. Topics include colonization and expansion; the Revolutionary Era; the New Nation; nationalism, sectionalism, and reform; the Era of Expansion; and crisis, Civil War, and reconstruction.

3
HIST 2112

(Pre-requisites: Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores)(Co-requisites: None)Emphasizes the study of the social, cultural, and political history of the United States from 1865 to the beginning of the twenty-first century and will equip the student to better understand the problems and challenges of the contemporary world in relation to events and trends in modern American history. The course also provides an overview of the history of Georgia and the development of its constitution. Topics include the Reconstruction Period; the great West, the new South, and the rise of the debtor; the Gilded Age; the progressive movement; the emergence of the U. S. in world affairs; the Roaring Twenties; the Great Depression; World War I; World War II; the Cold War and the 1950’s; the Civil Rights Movement; the 1960’s and 1970’s; and America since 1980.

3
POLS 1101

(Prerequisites: Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores) (Co-Requisite: None) Emphasizes study of government and politics in the United States. The focus of the course will provide an overview of the Constitutional foundations of the American political processes with a focus on government institutions and political procedures. The course will examine the constitutional framework, federalism, civil liberties and civil rights, public opinion, the media, interest groups, political parties, and the election process along with the three branches of government. In addition, this course will examine the processes of Georgia state government. Topics include foundations of government, political behavior, and governing institutions.

3
PSYC 1101

(Prerequisite: Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores) Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on critical thinking and fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychological disorders and treatment, stress and health, and social psychology.

3
SOCI 1101

(Prerequisite: Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Scores) Explores the sociological analysis of society, its culture, and structure. Sociology is presented as a science with emphasis placed on its methodology and theoretical foundations. Topics include basic sociological concepts, socialization, social interaction and culture, social groups and institutions, deviance and social control, social stratification, social change, and marriage and family.

3
Area III: Natural Sciences/Mathematics (6-7 hours) 3
MATH 1111

(Prerequisites: Appropriate algebra placement test score) Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.

3
Choose One (3 hours) (BIOL & CHEM also requires 1 hour lab)
BIOL 1111

(Prerequisite: Regular Admission) (Co-Requisites: BIOL 1111L) Provides an introduction to basic biological concepts with a focus on living cells. Topics include chemical principles related to cells, cell structure and function, energy and metabolism, cell division, protein synthesis, genetics, and biotechnology.

3
BIOL 1111 L

(Prerequisite: Regular Admission) (Co-Requisites: BIOL 1111) Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 1111. The laboratory exercises for this course include chemical principles related to cells, cell structure and function, energy and metabolism, cell division, protein synthesis, genetics, and biotechnology.

1
CHEM 1151

(Prerequisites: None) (Co-requisites: MATH 11103 OR MATH 1111 AND CHEM 1151L)Provides an introduction to basic chemical principles and concepts which explain the behavior of matter. Topics include measurements and units, structure of matter, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, gas laws, liquid mixtures, acids and bases, salts and buffers, and nuclear chemistry.

3
CHEM 1151L

(Prerequisites: None) (Co-requisites: MATH 1103 OR MATH 1111 AND CHEM 1151) Selected laboratory experiments paralleling the topics in CHEM 1151. The lab exercises for this course include units of measurements, structure of matter, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, gas laws, liquid mixtures, acids and bases, salts and buffers, and nuclear chemistry.

1
MATH 1113

(Prerequisites: Regular Admission and MATH 1111) Prepares students for calculus. The topics discussed include an intensive study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs. Applications include simple maximum and minimum problems, exponential growth and decay.

3
Area IV: Humanities/Fine Arts
ENGL 2130

(Prerequisite: ENGL 1101) Emphasizes American literature as a reflection of culture and ideas. A survey of important works in American literature. Includes a variety of literary genres: short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and novels. Topics include literature and culture, essential themes and ideas, literature and history, and research skills.

3
Occupational Courses - Complete 40 Hours 40
Faculty
Advisor

High School Initiatives Coordinator
Vidalia Campus - Building A, Office 163

Advisor

Dean of General Education & Learning Support
Vidalia Campus - Building A, Office 410

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